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Chandrayaan-2 : NASA's the fate decider
#1
Hello guys,

So as y'all know I'd urged a lot for this section to come into play, and finally our request has been accepted. Thanks to @deanhills for creating this section. Special thanks to @Manal, @tryp4vps, @LightDestory and all others who supported this idea. So now it's my duty to keep this section going. So let's get started with the first official post in this section.

NOTE: This is a respite for me, Fein tomorrow's Chemistry exam. Took exactly 20 minutes to compose this, but feeling much better now.

As y'all might be aware of Chandrayaan-2 mission by ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization), it's the first in the world to get it landed on the south pole of the Moon. And it was 95% successful.

The mission consisted of the lander Vikram and the rover Pragyan. The mission had a 14-day lifetime as it is largely powered by solar energy and one lunar day is equal to 14 Earth days. After these 14-days there will be a damn cold single night, but enough to freeze vital parts of the lander and Robert, making them non-functional. However, this fact in turn is now sealing the fate of ISRO.

The lander was supposed to be landing in the South Pole of the Moon on 7th September, 2019 between 1:30AM IST and 2:00AM IST. Everything was going right until a 2-km distance above the Moon, when the lander stopped contacting with the communicator which sends signals to the Earth.

The mission had been assumed to be a failure but, the Chandrayaan-2's orbiter revived our hopes the next morning. It showed that even after losing contact with the Earth data center, the lander did a successful hard-landing on the Moon and is now in a tilted position. What happened was that at the point if losing contact, the lander did a somersault and owing to phenomena like charged dust thrust and such others, managed to land on the Moon.

However, the rover, Pragyan never hatched out of his shell and that's the cause of most desperation. Efforts are being put in full-swing to re-establish communication but we've not been successful so far. Unfortunately, we've only 4-5 days left to do whatever was intended, since the lunar day should end by September 20-21.

NASA has been very cooperative in this field. They've extended their support to ISRO and are now helping in the reestablishment of the communication. Today NASA's lunar orbiter will fly over that point Vikram landed, and will try to take exact photographs of it and also try to communicate with it. Let's hope for the best guys!

There's one thing that ISRO can surely do - to take the Chandrayaan-2's orbiter closer to the Moon. This is because if the solar panels are damaged, the lander may send weak signals, which may be picked if the lander is close to the lunar surface. But this involves a high amount of risk too, as if the lander gets pulled by the gravity of the Moon and crashes the mission is doomed forever. It'll definitely be tried perhaps if the NASA's lunar orbiter is not able to do anything, as the last hope if ISRO.

Guys ISRO needs your prayers and well-wishes so that all the efforts of the scientists may not be in vain. Extend your support by praying for the success of the mission and comment your views on the topic here.

Eagerly waiting for what you're thinking about this mission.

Regards,
Sayan Bhattacharyya,

Heartiest thanks to Post4VPS and Virmach for my wonderful VPS 9!
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#2
I was really excited to read about the whole Chandryaan 2 thingy India was upto, It was a great attempt, and though they didn't quite succeed, they almost made it this time!
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#3
Hello guys!

Hope y'all are in good health. This time things didn't work out the way it was expected and it doesn't always happen you know. A couple of days ago, NASA's lunar orbiter did fly over the place Vikram had landed but unfortunately, due to disappearing sunlight the photos were not only blurred, but also shadows of moon's craters didn't enable deciphering of Vikram's location.

So tomorrow's the date - when the Chandrayaan-2 mission's gonna meet it's ultimate fate. Tomorrow the lunar night starts. At the south pole of the Moon, during lunar night, temperatures fall down even to -240 degree Celsius, during which it's predicted that all the working parts of Vikram and Pragyan will freeze, and it'll meet the ultimate fate. It'll be thrown out if function forever.

That's all friends, all Indians are beside ISRO supporting them and cheering them for their next mission. RIP Vikram and Pragyan!

Regards,
Sayan Bhattacharyya,

Heartiest thanks to Post4VPS and Virmach for my wonderful VPS 9!
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#4
We didn't fail fully at all. Mission experts have said that they already succeeded 95% of the mission's objective which is putting Orbiter in Moon's orbit which can be used to conduct studies. But anyway, good job, ISRO.

What I believe is in the lunar storm that took down the rover. Since it's the southern part of the moon and none of the nations have succeded to go there, it was difficult to predict the weather conditions out there. It was the lunar storm or hurricane that took down the rover. For those who are saying 2.1 km is too far away for a storm to catch... That's not true. ISRO debunked that 2.1 km was just an estimate measurement.

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#5
Yes @Manal.. Definitely true. As I'd said in my first post, we're actually 95% successful to have the Chandrayaan-2's orbiter still in place and the lunar orbiters life is 7 years, so it'll help to capture frozen ice and other signs of water on the South Pole of the Moon. The lander counterpart was supposed to examine the grind for water symptoms but nevermind, the lander will provide for a good percentage of it.

Indeed, we're the first nation to have something landed on the south pole, even if it wasn't the planned soft-landing. And indeed the reason you posted is correct - it was due to the charged lunar dust storm which could've been easily avoided if the landing was delayed by just a day.

We would not only have avoided the somersault of the lander due to the charged particles acting, but also our mission would've been 100% successful.

Nevermind, cheers to ISRO for all their efforts!

Regards,
Sayan Bhattacharyya,

Heartiest thanks to Post4VPS and Virmach for my wonderful VPS 9!
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#6
I congrats India for this Try and hardwork. we always read and listen about a story which also a part of our literature . "Try Try again" and we have a Good luck for Next time for Indian Space mission.
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#7
Congratz to ISRO for even making it that far, It'd be more interesting If NASA was able to get some clear shots to see exactly what happened instead of making estimates, I hope ISRO's successful next time!
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#8
(09-21-2019, 01:36 PM)Honey Wrote:  Congratz to ISRO for even making it that far, It'd be more interesting If NASA was able to get some clear shots to see exactly what happened instead of making estimates, I hope ISRO's successful next time!

Actually NASA's orbiter was meant to do that, as it was capable of that. Today we'd have probably known the exact reason of Vikram's malfunctioning if only ISRO would've confirmed a couple of days before that it was difficult to establish connection with Vikram instead of keeping NASA on hold till 17th. I feel that was what sealed our fate.

When NASA's orbiter actually clicked the photographs of Vikram's estimated location, sunlight was fading in the South Pole of the Moon which made the photos blur. Also, since that's the lower pole the bigger craters of the Moon casted their shadows at Vikram's spot, which hid him. In fact ISRO confirmed that he was actually hid in one of those shadows as in two or more photos, a shiny object was seen at the same spot. However that wasn't enough to understand what the NASA's orbiter was expected to achieve.

Nevermind, it was a great learning and enriching experience for all of us. It acted as the impetus for ISRO as today NASA's Chief, Dr. K Sivan confirmed that 98% of the mission was successful as due to fuel savings, the Chandrayaan-2's orbiter's life was increased from 1 to 7.5 years. Indeed a great achievement, which will serve as a good knowledge source during the upcoming 2021 Gaganyaan mission of the ISRO.

Cheers to ISRO!
Sayan Bhattacharyya,

Heartiest thanks to Post4VPS and Virmach for my wonderful VPS 9!
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#9
Well, it's quite an achievement. Budget wise I think even NASA can learn a thing or two from this. I wonder what exactly went wrong with the lander. Maybe something hit the communications array? I really dont know anything about this but can't they contact the Rover either?
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#10
Yeah @xdude. It's one for sure. NASA's budget for it's missions as of 2018 was $21 billion whereas ISRO's was only $1.2 billion. That was a big reason why you know NASA's lunar craft reached in approximately 3 days whereas we required around 7 weeks, ie approximately 48 days.

For your question regarding what went wrong with Vikram, here's it:

(09-17-2019, 09:28 AM)sohamb03 Wrote:  ...It showed that even after losing contact with the Earth data center, the lander did a successful hard-landing on the Moon and is now in a tilted position. What happened was that at the point if losing contact, the lander did a somersault and owing to phenomena like charged dust thrust and such others, managed to land on the Moon. ....

That's basically it. And the rover, ie, Pragyan, was supposed to hatch out of Vikram on it's own. Vikram had solar panels installed which would power the rover enough for it to do it's job. The mission was never meant to introduce human intervention. It was full automatic. Still something definitely could've been done if they could contact the lander, ie, Vikram first. Then a manual troubleshoot might have been possible.
Sayan Bhattacharyya,

Heartiest thanks to Post4VPS and Virmach for my wonderful VPS 9!
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